NEW RESEARCH PUBLICATION ALERT

Finally!!!! Our research study on Factors Influencing NCDs Literacy Levels in Vihiga County has been published in an international journal. The article is published in high impact factor journal —the European Journal of Environment and Public Health. The study was inspired by the IPAB (Increasing Priority, Attention and Budget allocation for NCDs) project we conducted in Vihiga County, Kenya. The IPAB project had tremendous achievements, so tremendous that we decided (together with my co-author) to conduct a study to help us understand how the project has contributed to improvement in NCDs literacy level of beneficiaries

Here is the abstract to the research.

Background: Health outcomes are closely influenced by health literacy levels. In most cases, lower health literacy levels have been found to be related to higher prevalence and incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs)–including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic respiratory diseases. Despite this wealth of knowledge on the relationship between literacy levels and NCDs, most previous studies have been on the incidence and the prevalence of NCDs.

Aims: This study therefore sought to assess the factors influencing non-communicable diseases literacy levels, Vihiga County (Kenya).

Methodology: The study used a qualitative cross-sectional study design to collect data through though questionnaires and interview guides administered through focused group discussions and key informant interviews. A sample size of 55 respondents was used in this study–mostly the IPAB project (Improving Priority and Budget Allocation to NCDs in Vihiga County) beneficiaries. The data collected from this study was coded using Microsoft excel version 25 and analyzed using statistical packages for social sciences (SPSS version 25) and inductive data analysis (IDA) for the qualitative data collected was analyzed through traditional significance test.

Results: The study reported that community health programs and initiatives on NCDs, patient support groups, culture and misinformation influence NCD literacy levels. The study findings indicate that culture and misinformation, patient support groups, and community health programmes and initiatives are three key components that need to be considered when improving NCDs literacy levels.

Conclusion: The study also concludes that IPAB project helped boost the resident’s knowledge and understanding of NCDs. The findings of this study offer critical insights to Vihiga County Government to tailor their NCDs advocacy programs to fit local context thereby enhancing the knowledge and understanding on NCDs.

Read the full paper by clicking the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) in the citation below.

Citation (APA)

Ogweno, S. O., & Oduor, K. (2022). Assessment of Factors Influencing Non-Communicable Diseases Literacy Levels in Vihiga County–A Qualitative Cross-Sectional Study. European Journal of Environment and Public Health, 6(1), em0108. https://doi.org/10.21601/ejeph/12021

Published by Oduor Kevin

ODUOR KEVIN is a Public Health Specialist with considerable experience in the health care industry. He has worked in various organizations, leading projects and programs aimed at improving the health outcomes of people living with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) and the general population. Oduor Kevin is currently the Chief Programs Officer at Stowelink Inc, a youth-led organization with a single most focus on addressing the burden of NCDs. Oduor’s experience in project management is attributed to his work at Population Services Kenya (PSK) where he served as a member of the National Coordinating Committee for Kitu Ni Kukachora project. Further, in 2019, Oduor Kevin was appointed as Kenyatta University Campus Director by Millenium Campus Network (MCN) to supervise and lead Millennium Fellows in their Social Impact projects. During this assignment, he successfully supervised the fellows and delivered them for graduation under the banner of Millennium Fellowship.

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